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Chichen Itza - cover photo for One Month Mexico Itinerary
Intineraries
Sandra

ONE MONTH MEXICO ITINERARY

Mexico is a vast country that covers a land area of almost 2,000,000 square kilometers. So let’s be real –  unless you are planning to

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Hiking in Ushuiai cover photo - the river, muddy meadow and snowy mountains in the distance
Argentina
Sandra

HIKING IN USHUAIA – DOs & definite DON’Ts

Hiking at the end of the world? C’mon, admit it, there’s a super cool edge to it.

And besides, we Slovenians are known to be a “hiking nation”, so when our new friends from the USA invited us to go hiking in Ushuaia together, saying “nope” was not an option. No matter the circumstances.

And that’s perhaps where things started to go wrong.

This is a story about our hilarious hiking in Ushuaia and all the DOs and DON’Ts you should(not) repeat.

Read More »
Traditional houses in Prekmurje region, Slovenia
Slovenia
Sandra

YOUR GUIDE TO PREKMURJE REGION, SLOVENIA

A river that winds lazily across wide plains. White storks nesting on chimneys. Picturesque churches and unique architecture. Lush green hills, lined with vineyards and mighty castles sitting among them. Thermal waters for relaxation and the juiciest Slovenian dessert. Welcome to Prekmurje region in Slovenia!

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“HEY CABALLOS!” (Cuba Travelogue 3/5)

A view from above

This post may contain affiliate links, meaning we will receive a tiny commission if you choose to click through and make a purchase. But don’t worry, clicking on them won’t cost you a penny more – it just means we can keep creating free content for you – and that our furry companions can keep living their best life with all their fancy toys.  

 


THE AUTHOR’S NOTE:

When I started this blog, I wrote a few travelogues. So, if you’re interested in those, by all means—keep reading! ? However, as time went on, I shifted my focus towards travel stories and witty guide-like posts to help you plan your adventures. If you wanna know more, check out my homepage!


 

After sightseeing in the bustling streets of Havana, we headed to the tiny village of Viñales. Located southeast of the island, Viñales is famous for its lush tobacco plantations and limestone monoliths. It’s a gorgeous places under UNESCO World Heritage protection.

Every travel guide is filled with endless paragraphs about the wonders and beauty the valley can offer—especially if you decide to go horse riding in Viñales. Naturally, we decided to try it for ourselves.

 

Our adventure started first thing in the morning, as our guide picked us up with his horse cart to take us to the place where the actual tour started.

Unlike elsewhere in the world, traveling by a horse–drawn cart is common here, as are bumpy old roads. Riding in the cart gave us a glimpse into 19th-century travel from town to town. TBH, the 19th century wouldn’t fit me.

Luckily, the ride wasn’t too long, and soon, we arrived at the starting point.

But before the tour started, they kindly made us watch how local cigars are produced. Of course, after they had been neatly wrapped, we were offered to try and buy some. Mind you, the prices skyrocketed rather quickly.

Afterward, we finally met our horses ( = caballos, sp.), Ranchero and Palomito.

It had been over 15 years since I last sat on a horse and only Bojan’s second time. Regardless, the locals handed us the horse-halters, and with a slap to the horses’ buttocks, we were off.

Bojan was rather lucky, as Palomito was a “couch potato of a horse” – steadily trotting along the road was enough for him, moreover, he was much more interested in chewing the leaves than getting Bojan from point A to point B.

I, on the other hand, had the exact opposite problem. It seemed as if Ranchero would drink a pack of Red Bull before the start of the tour, and it showed.

He quickly became annoyed when another horse tried to get in front of him, and each time someone tried to overtake him, he started to go faster and faster. Therefore, to put things into perspective, I was constantly being thrown from one side of the saddle to the other, and I honestly hope that no one was there to film that mess of a ride!

As some tracks were rather narrow and steep, I was just glad that I managed to hold on to the saddle AT ALL.

 

 

The whole trip was supposed to last four hours or so, but we stopped in between for quite some time.

They showed us some of the Cuban plants on the local farm and the production of coffee and local rum, which was pretty interesting and a nice addition to the horse riding tour!

Despite initially expecting to spend the entire trip riding, my buttocks were ultimately grateful for the breaks. 😀

 

 

 

Read next: A journey to the beach – or at least we thought so (Cuba Travelogue 4/5)

 


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Books about travel and self discovery

20+ BOOKS ABOUT TRAVEL AND SELF DISCOVERY YOU SHOULD READ THIS YEAR

There’s one thing that can transport you to the other side of the world even quicker than a plane.

A book.

You open it, you read a few lines and the magic happens.

The world around you dissolves and just like Dumbledore himself would have taught you how to Apparate, you find yourself far, far away.

But not only travel books take us on the journey – they can transform us like the journey itself.
I asked fellow wanderlusters about their favorite books about travel and self-discovery and we’ve come up with a pretty cool list.

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Hiking in Ushuiai cover photo - the river, muddy meadow and snowy mountains in the distance

HIKING IN USHUAIA – DOs & definite DON’Ts

Hiking at the end of the world? C’mon, admit it, there’s a super cool edge to it.

And besides, we Slovenians are known to be a “hiking nation”, so when our new friends from the USA invited us to go hiking in Ushuaia together, saying “nope” was not an option. No matter the circumstances.

And that’s perhaps where things started to go wrong.

This is a story about our hilarious hiking in Ushuaia and all the DOs and DON’Ts you should(not) repeat.

Read More »